Advice When Buying A Second Hand Digital Camera

The price of digital cameras are constantly falling and for that reason it is possible to get your hands on a really affordable model these days. If you want a more high tech camera though then you will find that these can be quite expensive. If you can’t afford to pay the full price for one of these more expensive digital cameras then you might consider purchasing used devices. Here are just a few tips for people looking to buy second hand digital cameras.

- It is a good idea to do a bit of research before looking for digital cameras so that you have an idea of the average price for a used model of the type you are looking for. Having this information is very useful because it will allow you to have greater bargaining power when it comes to buying one of these cameras. If you don’t know how much things are selling for then you won’t know if you are getting a good deal or not.

- The fact that not much can actually go wrong with a digital camera means that buying a used one is relatively safe. But there are a number of areas that you should check in order to see if they are working properly such as the flash, the LSD display and the autofocus.

- When you are considering purchasing a second hand camera it is also important that you think about your ability to buy needed accessories. You may not find the accessories you require so readily available if the camera is quite old. In that case you might want to see if the seller is willing to throw in a few of these accessories as part of the deal.

- It is important to make sure that you can get your memory cards for the camera you are buying before parting with your money.

64gb compact flash can be found in countless products nowadays. 32GB compact flash cards are a good example. Another one that is used nowadays is the MKV media player.

Nikon P7000 – A High Performance Compact Camera

Coolpix P7000

Nikon has unveiled the new Coolpix P7000 as the successor of the Coolpix P6000. The Nikon P7000 represents the best of both worlds. It is an exciting point and shoot digital camera offering from Nikon, as it not only provides expanded creative and manual control found in D-SLR cameras, but also provides photo enthusiasts with the simplicity and portability of Coolpix digital cameras.

The 10.1-megapixel Nikon P7000 sports a large 1/1.7-inch CCD sensor coupled with a 7.1x Wide Angle Optical Zoom Nikkor ED Lens, a 921,000 dot 3-inch LCD screen, utilizes a vibration reduction system, records 720p HD video, and has a variety of user friendly features like auto selection of scenes and subject tracking.

The Nikon Coolpix P7000 adopts of the latest image-processing engine, EXPEED C2. This processor enables capture of high-resolution images with rich tonal expression.  It will certainly attract to photographers who like to shoot in RAW. The RAW file can be opened in the P7000 and via the new Nikon View NX 2 and Capture NX software.

The Coolpix P7000 sports a variety of functions that enable superior rendering when shooting at high sensitivities, including a Noise Reduction Filter and a Low Noise Night Mode. ISO sensitivity ranges from ISO 100 to 6400 (expandable to ISO 12,800 in Low Noise Night Mode) to ensure fabulously sharp, crisp images when shooting in low-light or photographing fast-moving subjects. The P7000 also sports 5-Way VR Image Stabilization System, which utilizes a variety of tactics including optical lens shift to minimize the effect of camera shake to help banish the blur while shooting handheld or in low-light.

In addition, the Nikon P7000 offers a number of new functions, including Tone Level Information display and Zoom Memory, which provide greater control over shooting and resulting images. With a number of high-sensitivity shooting functions to choose from depending upon shooting conditions, high-speed response and controls that support intuitive operation, the Nikon P7000 is the optimal camera for nature photography as well as wide variety of other scenes.

For more information, go to Coolpix P7000 Digital Camera.

Panasonic Lumix DMC G2 – A Great Compact Digital SLR

The Panasonic Lumix DMC-G2 is a relatively small, DSLR-like camera that uses the Micro Four Thirds  sensor jointly developed by Panasonic and Olympus. It has many of the same features as a DSLR, including the use of interchangeable lenses and RAW format, but does not have a mirror box and utilizes an electronic viewfinder rather than an optical viewfinder. The G2 and the G10, a more basic version of the camera reviewed here last month, are updates to the Lumix DMC-G1, released in 2008.

Like the G10, the Panasonic DMC G2 has a 12.1 megapixel Micro Four Thirds CMOS sensor, full manual controls including aperture and shutter priority, an intelligent auto mode and movie modes in both AVCHD Lite and motion JPEG formats. But, unlike the G10, the G2 has a fully articulated LCD monitor that uses touch screen technology, though the touch screen is not the only method of control.

The Panasonic Lumix DMC G2 has a classic DSLR look, with a large handgrip on the right, but it’s smaller than even the smallest entry-level DSLR. Its dimensions are 4.x 3.3 x 2.9 inches (124 x 84 x 74mm) and its weight, body only, is 13.09 ounces (371 grams). The Panasonic G2 comes with a DMW-BLB13 lithium-ion battery, a charger, an AV cable, a USB cable, a shoulder/neck strap, a 218 page manual, a stylus pen, a body cap and a CD containing Panasonic’s PhotofunStudio 5.0 HD Edition photo management software, and Silkypix for editing RAW images. The digital camera comes in basic black (the color I reviewed), as well as a striking red and blue.

While the DMC-G2 is on the small side, compared to a typical entry-level DSLR, it has excellent build quality. Its construction is mostly metal with a plastic coating. Dials and buttons are very sturdy and work smoothly. The camera is weighty in the hand, especially with a lens attached. Although the camera looks small, it is not delicate. While I wouldn’t advocate dropping it, I think it could survive a modest fall rather well.

The DMC-G2 is very well-balanced, with a deep right-side handgrip. There is also a useful thumb rest in the rear. Although the camera looks like it could be used with one hand, it’s probably too heavy to do so comfortably. But there is ample room on the left side for a thumb and a couple of fingers, permitting quite steady two-handed shooting. The camera has a very smooth surface, which tends to make it a bit slippery. All the buttons and dials are reachable and easy to use. As a newcomer to this type of camera, I was surprised at the number of dedicated controls for functions that, when using Point and Shoot  cameras, are only accessible through the menus. Once I explored the various controls I realized that they were very useful shortcuts.

The top left side of the DMC-G2 contains a switch to select among manual focus, auto focus single and auto focus continuous. There is also a nice dial to select face detection, auto focus tracking, 23-area auto focus and one area auto focus. The top right of the camera contains a switch to select the drive mode – single, burst, auto-bracket or self-timer. There are also dedicated buttons for movie recording and for activating the camera’s intelligent auto mode. The large mode dial, also located at the top right, contains numerous recording modes including program, aperture priority, shutter priority, manual, custom, movie, scenes, my color, portrait, scenery, sports, close-up and night portrait. The top right of the camera includes a power switch and a large shutter button. At the center there’s a hinged flash and a flash hot shoe.

The rear of the camera is dominated by the electronic viewfinder and LCD monitor. The viewfinder is fairly large and surrounded by a rubberized eye cup. The viewfinder can be set to be automatically activated, and the LCD deactivated, when the camera is raised to eye level. To the left of the viewfinder is a button to activate or deactivate the viewfinder manually. There is also a diopter control to adjust the viewfinder to compensate for vision issues.

The G2′s 3.0-inch LCD has 460,000 dots of resolution and a 3/2 aspect ratio. It folds out and can be twisted 90 degrees forward and 180 degrees back, which I found to be very useful in taking photos at strange angles. The LCD monitor can be adjusted to seven brightness levels and the color can be tinted for better visibility. It automatically brightens and dims depending on the brightness of the environment. I rarely had a problem seeing the monitor, even in bright sunlight.

The LCD monitor also has touch screen ability which can be operated by one’s fingertip or an excellent stylus (included with the camera). The touch screen can be used for selecting menu items as well as focusing. Generally speaking, I wasn’t crazy about using the touch screen. I felt the response time was a bit laggy and the screen icons were not intuitive. I had a much more positive experience with the touch screen in the Sony DSC-TX7, a small but sophisticated Point and Shoot  camera I recently reviewed. However, the G2 does not force the user to rely on the touch screen, as every menu item can be selected by the camera’s many buttons and dials.

The DMC-G2′s speed of operation is very good in most respects. The camera starts up almost instantly and shot-to-shot speed is very quick. I was able to take ten shots in a row, pressing the shutter as fast as I could. However, its auto focus speed is not all that quick compared to a DSLR’s.

The Panasonic Lumix G2 uses a contrast-based AF system rather than the phase detection system used by most DSLR’s, which is often slower. However, compared to similar mirrorless cameras produced by Sony, Samsung and Olympus that also use the contrast system, the G2′s performance is quite good. I used the G2 in various lighting conditions and I found its focus to be very reliable.

The DMC-G2 produces sharp images with excellent white balance and strong, but natural looking color. It can shoot RAW images for those who prefer to post-process rather than leaving relying on the camera’s processor. You can make the camera to shoot two versions of the same image, one JPEG and one RAW.

While outdoor images were consistently, good I had a problem with indoor images. I found the auto white balance function to be inaccurate. For instance, the color of the wall below has a bluish tint, but was more yellow in actuality. I tried different white balance settings but was never able to find one that captured the overall color of the image.

I was impressed with the Panasonic Lumix G2. It’s a solidly-built, well constructed camera. All of the controls work smoothly and very quickly. The camera’s many dedicated buttons mean that you rarely have to consult the menu, something I greatly appreciated. The swiveling LCD is a pleasure to use, as is the high resolution electronic viewfinder.

Canon Powershot SD980 – Brilliant Point And Shoot Camera

Canon’s first foray into touch screen territory comes in the form of the PowerShot SD980 IS. It falls into line style-wise with the current generation of Digital ELPH cameras and it won’t look out of place sitting side-by-side with your iPod and your touch screen smartphone – it’s curvy, boldly colored, and is relatively slim for a camera housing a 5x optical zoom lens.

Like the Panasonic Lumix FX580, the Canon Powershot SD980 IS keeps all of the physical buttons and offers the touch screen as a kind of supplement in terms of camera operation. The result is more of a hybrid than a total touch screen makeover. There are three major areas where the touch screen will come into play: image review, touch-selected auto focus lock, and shooting mode selection.

It’s a new interface for the PowerShot lineup, but there are plenty of familiar features here as well. The DIGIC 4 processor, optical image stabilizer, and 12.1 megapixel 1/2.3 inch CCD are carried over from previous Digital ELPHs. Slow, steady enhancements to an existing, capable platform have been the trend for Canon in recent years. Does the SD980 follow the trend, or is it just another very pretty interface?

The Canon Powershot SD980 features a 5x optical zoom, starting at an equivalent 24mm for a nice wide angle and extending to 120mm. It’s quite a fast lens, with a maximum aperture of f/2.8 at wide angle. Maximum aperture at telephoto is f/5.9. Zoom operation is a little bit noisy, which is perhaps one of the reasons why optical zoom isn’t available in video recording mode.

Barrel distortion cropped up more often than pin cushioning. The vertical lines of the window in the wide angle image below do bow outward slightly. In the telephoto image, there’s not as much evidence of distortion.

The get-up-and-go PowerShot SD980 takes some very nice images right out of the box. Colors are bright, in the traditional vein of Canon’s consumer digitals, and reasonably saturated. The neutral setting, one of the options available under the “My Colors” submenu, will bring saturation down a notch. Adjustments can also be made to color, saturation, and sharpness and saved as a custom setting under the “my colors” submenu.

It should also be noted that though the SD980 boasts 16:9 wide-aspect image capture, you won’t be able to utilize it at the camera’s highest resolution. The wide images are roughly 9 megapixels.

Our studio images show noise beginning to appear starting at ISO 100, though it’s very faint in the cropped image. ISO 400 displays more distortion, though the thumbnail image still looks fairly good.

What the PowerShot SD980 IS does the best is show off. Flipping through images with a swipe of the LCD or a flick of the wrist is sure to please a small crowd of friends and family. However, no camera is going to inspire any real “wow” factor if the images don’t look as good as the actual interface. The SD980 delivers dependable image quality whether or not you choose to utilize the touch screen.

The PowerShot SD980 won’t compete with Canon’s more advanced compacts, but it’s as good a performer as the popular SD1200. It hits a sweet spot between chic design and reliable performance. In the expanding world of touch screen cameras, the SD980 is as good as any we’ve seen thus far. It doesn’t offer the level of control that Panasonic’s Lumix FX580 does, but manual control is probably not what you’re after if you’re shopping for a touch LCD. If it’s reliable image quality with limited user input that you want, then the PowerShot SD980 is a good option.

Camera Guide: Nikon D300 Review

The Nikon D300 is the amatuers professional camera.
As an amatuer photographer let me just say that this is a brilliant camera and I feel like a pro every time I shoot with it.

For the past 4 years I’ve been using Nikon’s predecessor, the D200.It’s an excellent camera and will provide a good comparison to the Nikon D300.

First I must say that the D300 produces incredible image quality.Compared with the D200 the highlights, shadows and colours are all far better. The sensor is now 12M pixels and the auto focus system boasts an impressive 51 points compared with the D200s 11.

The impressive Nikon D300 body is constructed of Magnesium alloy which makes it very strong.It weighs an impressive 825 grams. Add a decent lens and you’ve over 1kg.It sounds heavy but it’s not that bad.  My standard D300 lens is the Nikkor 18-200mm VR, my wife will shoot all day without any bother.

The D300 battery lasts three times longer that the D200, even though the battery is identical.I don’t know how Nikon do it but it’s a welcome improvement.

The other noticable difference is the LCD monitor is now 3″ compared with the D200s 2.5″. Ironically you would think that this would cut back battery life. Playback and menu functionality are significantly faster.

The only annoying thing I’ve discovered is that the continous advance shooting mode does  not work with the built-in flash.Consequently when you’re shooting in continous mode (Ch or Cl) and using the built-in flash the Nikon D300 will only produce one image.  If you use a speedlight then this is not a problem.

The price is at present $1800 on Amazon.  Please note that this is for the D300 body only.

The D300 review suggests that the Nikon D300 is a great camera for the budding professional and is highly recommended.

Canon Powershot SD980 – Brilliant Point And Shoot Camera

Canon’s first foray into touch screen territory comes in the form of the PowerShot SD980 IS. It falls into line style-wise with the current generation of Digital ELPH cameras and it won’t look out of place sitting side-by-side with your iPod and your touch screen smartphone – it’s curvy, boldly colored, and is relatively slim for a camera housing a 5x optical zoom lens.

Like the Panasonic Lumix FX580, the Canon Powershot SD980 IS keeps all of the physical buttons and offers the touch screen as a kind of supplement in terms of camera operation. The result is more of a hybrid than a total touch screen makeover. There are three major areas where the touch screen will come into play: image review, touch-selected auto focus lock, and shooting mode selection.

It’s a new interface for the PowerShot lineup, but there are plenty of familiar features here as well. The DIGIC 4 processor, optical image stabilizer, and 12.1 megapixel 1/2.3 inch CCD are carried over from previous Digital ELPHs. Slow, steady enhancements to an existing, capable platform have been the trend for Canon in recent years. Does the SD980 follow the trend, or is it just another very pretty interface?

The Canon Powershot SD980 features a 5x optical zoom, starting at an equivalent 24mm for a nice wide angle and extending to 120mm. It’s quite a fast lens, with a maximum aperture of f/2.8 at wide angle. Maximum aperture at telephoto is f/5.9. Zoom operation is a little bit noisy, which is perhaps one of the reasons why optical zoom isn’t available in video recording mode.

Barrel distortion cropped up more often than pin cushioning. The vertical lines of the window in the wide angle image below do bow outward slightly. In the telephoto image, there’s not as much evidence of distortion.

The get-up-and-go PowerShot SD980 takes some very nice images right out of the box. Colors are bright, in the traditional vein of Canon’s consumer digitals, and reasonably saturated. The neutral setting, one of the options available under the “My Colors” submenu, will bring saturation down a notch. Adjustments can also be made to color, saturation, and sharpness and saved as a custom setting under the “my colors” submenu.

It should also be noted that though the SD980 boasts 16:9 wide-aspect image capture, you won’t be able to utilize it at the camera’s highest resolution. The wide images are roughly 9 megapixels.

Our studio images show noise beginning to appear starting at ISO 100, though it’s very faint in the cropped image. ISO 400 displays more distortion, though the thumbnail image still looks fairly good.

What the PowerShot SD980 IS does the best is show off. Flipping through images with a swipe of the LCD or a flick of the wrist is sure to please a small crowd of friends and family. However, no camera is going to inspire any real “wow” factor if the images don’t look as good as the actual interface. The SD980 delivers dependable image quality whether or not you choose to utilize the touch screen.

The PowerShot SD980 won’t compete with Canon’s more advanced compacts, but it’s as good a performer as the popular SD1200. It hits a sweet spot between chic design and reliable performance. In the expanding world of touch screen cameras, the SD980 is as good as any we’ve seen thus far. It doesn’t offer the level of control that Panasonic’s Lumix FX580 does, but manual control is probably not what you’re after if you’re shopping for a touch LCD. If it’s reliable image quality with limited user input that you want, then the PowerShot SD980 is a good option.

Nikon Coolpix S570 Compact Digital Camera – Nikon’s Junior Camera Is Stacked With Excellent Features

The CoolPix S570 is one of the junior models of Nikon’s impressive range of ultra compacts, at the other end of the spectrum from the technologically advanced S640 and S630. However while it may be a budget model very few corners have been cut on design or construction. It has a strong and well finished all-aluminium body, and is available in black, red, blue, pink or the silver finish shown here. It’s a small camera, measuring 92 x 56.5 x 21.5mm, and quite light at 137g fully loaded, although it does feel slightly heavy for its size, adding to the overall feeling of quality.

Despite its size the Nikon Coolpix S570 handles extremely well. The finish has a slightly matt texture, making it easy to grip, and the rear panel control layout leaves room for a decent sized textured thumb grip at the back. The controls themselves are quite large and mostly well labelled, although the black-on-black etched symbols on the D-pad are a bit hard to see in dim light. The S570 is designed to be easy to use, and the controls and menus are very simple. The zoom control is a rotary bezel around the shutter button, and it is a bit jerky, but with 12 steps between minimum and maximum it’s capable of fairly precise framing. The overall impression of using the camera is good; it feels responsive, capable and easy to get along with.

Nikon Coolpix S570 Features:

  • Image Sensor Type: CCD
  • Total Pixels: 12.39 million
  • Effective Pixels: 12.0 million
  • Image Area (pixels): 4000 x 3000(12M)
  • LCD Monitor Size: 2.7 in. diagonal
  • LCD Monitor Type: TFT-LCD with anti-reflection coating
  • LCD Monitor Resolution: 230,000 Dots
  • Lowest ISO Sensitivity: 80
  • Highest ISO Sensitivity: 3200
  • Storage Media: SD & SDHC
  • Internal Memory: Approx. 47MB
  • Image Stabilization: Electronic
  • Movie Modes: Movie with sound
  • Interface: Hi-speed USB
  • Lens Zoom: 5x
  • Lens Specification: 5x Zoom-NIKKOR; 5.0-25.0mm (35mm [135] format picture angle: 28-140 mm); f/2.7-6.6; Digital zoom: up to 4x (35mm [135] format picture angle: 560 mm)
  • Focus Range: Approx. 1ft. 6in. (45cm) to infinity, Macro close-up mode:1.2 in. (3cm) to infinity
  • Battery Type: Rechargeable
  • Battery / Batteries: EN-EL10 Lithium-ion Battery
  • AC Adapter: EH-62D AC Adapter (Optional)
  • Battery Charger: MH-63 Battery Charger
  • Battery Life (shots per charge): Nikon Rechargeable: 200 shots (CIPA)
  • Approx. Dimensions:
    Height: 2.2 in. (56.5mm)
    Width: 3.6 in. (92mm)
    Depth: 0.8 in. (21.5mm)
  • Approx. Weight: 4.2 oz. (120g)
  • Supplied Software: Software Suite CD-ROM

Although the Nikon CoolPix S570 has a fairly average specification and lacks a number of useful and popular features, it is very well made, easy and fun to use, and handles extremely well. It has above average performance, works well in low light, and the image quality is also better than most others in its class. All in all, the S570 is excellent value for money.

Casio Exilim FH20 – Good Camera Packed With Great Features

The FH20  has a smaller, lighter body than the rather bulky F1, something far more in line with other recent super-zoom cameras such as the Nikon P90 or Olympus SP-590UZ. It’s still quite far from petite, measuring 122.6 x 81.4 x 84.5mm and weighing a hefty 585g including four AA alkaline batteries, but it is very solidly made and the large comfortable rubber-coated handgrip provides superb handling. Of the super-zoom cameras I’ve looked at recently it’s certainly the nicest to hold.

In terms of performance it almost goes without saying that the EX-FH20 is very impressive, although it’s a bit slow to start up and shut down again, taking a little under four seconds for either operation. However in single shot mode at the highest resolution it can shoot very quickly, managing a frame every 1.3 seconds. I’ve already covered the camera’s remarkable performance in its numerous continuous shooting modes.

As usual with Casio cameras the autofocus system is very fast, and operates very well in low light or at longer zoom ranges, although like many zoom cameras it has some problems coping with both low light and extreme magnification. The camera has a bright green AF assist lamp with a range of about two metres for shooting in very low light conditions.

The Casio Exilifilm FH20 is a very versatile camera, but as is often the case with hybrid or multi-purpose gadgets it doesn’t do any one task particularly well, when compared to dedicated single-function products. It can shoot HD video, but not as well as a camcorder; it can take still images, but not as well as other recent super-zooms. Even its party-trick high-speed capabilities are eclipsed by its own stablemate the EX-F1, or the slightly cheaper FC100. It’s quite a nice camera to use, but is that enough?

The Verdict

While the Exilim EX-FH20 is an attractively designed and well made camera with superb handling and outstanding performance. It has some almost unique features, and although the high-speed continuous shooting is great for action photography, the 1000fps video mode is little more than just a novelty. Image noise can be problem.

Thanks for reading this Casio FH20 Review. Compare Digital Camera has many more reviews of digital cameras and equipment so for more Casio EX FH 20 Reviews please visit the website.

Buying A Camera – Questions You Should Ask Yourself

Just as a picture is worth a thousands words, a camera can cost a pretty penny depending upon what you need. Any person planning on being a serious hobbist or professional photographer, should expect to spend money on equipment. You can get started in photography for under $100, or you can go all out and buy a complete set of top of the line gear for as much as youre willing to spend. Since there are so many options for new photographers, lets skip all of the cool accessories (filters, lenses, tripods) and break down your most important first purchase: The Camera.

What Do You Need in a Camera?

The first thing to consider when buying a camera is to determine why you want a camera and know what you want it to do. For example, an all manual DSLR (like Canon’s Rebel) is great fun for photographers but is likely a major hassle if you’re taking pictures of your friends out having fun. Heres a few key questions to ask yourself to help decide what you need:

  • Do I want to use film or digital?
  • Am I shooting for fun, or for a career?
  • How comfortable am I operating a manual SLR?
  • Is image quality important to me?

Since every camera works differently and has it’s own pros and cons, you’ll need to figure out what you want so you won’t be overwhelmed with the choice in equipment. Professional photographers or those seeking to become professionals may not want to sacrifice image quality for cost, while the average shooter may not need that extra 0.5% of clarity for their family collage picture frame display. Its all up to you.

What Can You Spend?
The sky is the limit when spending money on cameras. You can pick up a little pocket camera for around $100, or you can spend as much as $10,000 on a top of the line digital. Even a manual film SLR can be expensive so make sure you know what you want before making a purchase. Before you pull out your wallet, ask yourself these questions:

  • Can I really afford this camera?
  • What features do I really need?
  • Is this camera suitable for the activities Im buying it for?

Sure, a camera with 13,000 frames per second shooting option and a giant touch screen would be great, but it is overkill for taking a few family photos. Don’t go overboard but if you want to work as an professional, don’t sacrifice on flexibility and results just so you spend less out of pocket in the beginning. You’ll end up having to buy a better camera later, so it’s often best to wait a little longer so you can buy exactly what you need. You will be happy you did.

If youre honest with yourself about what you need from your camera and how much you can spend on it, youre going to be a lot more satisfied with your purchase down the line. If you need help working out what you need or how different cameras perform in different situations, do a little online research, read customer reviews, or talk to the guys and gals at your local photo shop (not the drugstore!).

If you’re buying a camera to take pictures of family and friends, your camera will likely give you what you need regardless of what you spend.That’s because most consumer level cameras shoot just fine in 90% of shooting situations. Mostly because the majority of people take pictures to put them in a picture frame at their home or office.Some of the photos in a recent Swimsuit Edition of Sports Illustrated were shot with a disposable camera so dont think for a second that a lower budget is a handicap. As always, the most important thing is to have fun and take great pictures so you can enjoy looking at them whether you hang them on your wall or display them in a decorative picture frame on your table..

Panasonic DMC ZS3 Digital Camera – Great Point And Shoot Camera

The Panasonic DMC ZS3 is a full-featured, compact digital camera with full high-definition video recording built-in. Available in 4 bold colors, the stylish, ergonomic body is easy to carry and fun to use. The 10.1 megapixel image sensor captures all of your memories with rich color and remarkable detail. Whether you’re shooting wide landscapes or an action-packed sporting event, the 12x Leica VARIO-ELMAR zoom lens will completely satisfy your vision.

Panasonic’s newly developed Intelligent Exposure (iA) Mode simplifies face detection autofocus, AF tracking for moving subjects, optical image stabilization, scene mode selection, and ISO to make great pictures as simple as point-and-shoot. Concentrate on the subject in front of you–let the camera do the rest.

The Panasonic Lumix DMC ZS3 brings HD video to your digital lifestyle like never before. Recording in full 1280 x 720 at 60 frames-per-second in AVCHD format brings smooth, broadcast video quality to your family vacations, sporting events, and other memories. And with the included YouTube Uploader software and integrated HDMI port, it’s easy to share your videos and pictures online or on your HDTV. The Panasonic Lumix DMC-ZS3 meets all the needs of the 21st century digital lifestyle.

The Panasonic Lumix ZS3 has these features:

  • Leica optics is world-renowned for their high quality and exceptional value. Coupled with the Lumix DMC-ZS3, the 12x Optical Leica Vario-Elmar lens provides dramatic wide angle to telephoto coverage. This range represents an excellent 35mm equivalent of 25-300mm. From landscapes to portraits, macro to sports action shots, this optic ensures first-class image quality in an ultra-convenient focal range.
  • Taking great photos should be as simple as point-and-shoot. That’s the philosophy behind the Panasonic’s Intelligent Auto Exposure (iA). Combining face detection autofocus, AF tracking for moving subjects, image stabilization, scene mode selection, and auto ISO selection, the DMC-ZS3 delivers consistently beautiful photographs.
  • The Lumix DMC-ZS3 is equipped with Panasonic’s industry-leading MEGA Optical Image Stabilization (O.I.S.) that automatically detects and corrects for camera shake. Even under low-light conditions, the DMC-ZS3 provides consistently sharp, crisp, photographs you can be proud of. The technology works seamlessly with or without a flash.
  • Using the professional AVCHD format, the DMC-ZS3 is able to capture stunning high definition video at 1280 x 720 resolution at a smooth 30 frames-per-second (Class 6 SD card required). A built-in stereo mic brings Dolby Digital sound to all of your video recordings.
  • With 45MB of built-in memory, the DMC-ZS3 has ample space for storing and sharing your favorite photos. Share your holiday photos, vacation snaps, and other treasured memories without sacrificing space on your memory card.

If you would like more information please visit my digital camera website.